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Principles of Pro Style Offenses

Discussion in 'NCAA Football Discussion' started by JSU Zack, Mar 14, 2014.

  1. JSU Zack

    JSU Zack How do I IT?

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    Update: A full explanation of my pro spread offense, including a full list of plays, reads, and philosophy has been posted to my website: http://zackwhiteit.com/2015/11/03/the-pro-spread-offense/.

    We've been at Nutopia for well over a month now, and no one has posted this yet. I guess the "Old Guard" that ran pro style disappeared along with Flufftopia. As I am probably one of the last few people to run this offense on a semi-regular basis, I will carry the torch of those now gone.

    [​IMG]
    A tip of the hat to the granddaddy of modern football: Bill Walsh.

    What is pro style?
    Professional style football is a chameleon. It takes the best parts of different offenses and mixes them together to create a sound scheme that can work in a variety of situations. At this point, there are four types of pro style offenses used in the NFL:
    West Coast
    Air Coryell
    Erhardt-Perkins
    Any of the above with additional spread elements (zone read/bubble screens/etc.)


    Pro style offenses use tight ends and fullbacks extensively, but they are all but dead in other offenses. These two positions lend to the physical nature of pro style offenses and their desire to beat you by wearing you down with a strong running game & crisp passing game.

    What gives Pro Style offenses an advantage?
    At the college level, pro style offenses typically fit a single mold:
    A big, smart offensive line
    An accurate quarterback
    One or two backs who can run between the tackles

    A featured receiver who is a mismatch for defenders

    This formula has been used time and time again to win championships; Miami, USC, Ohio State, and Alabama all won with a pro scheme. This offense likes to burn the clock and reduce the opposing team's chances of scoring.

    What are the downsides of a Pro Style offense?
    First, the pro style offense is part of a bigger "team" philosophy of physical toughness. If the other team is scoring every drive, the pro style team will lose the game nine times out of ten because they are not designed to win a track meet. In many situations, a five minute drive that ends in a punt is considered a win as it gives the defense a rest and keeps the other team's offense off the field. NFL teams who drastically favor one side of the ball versus the other usually lose to teams who are well-rounded in all three phases of the game.

    Secondly, the pro style offense is conservative by nature to minimize mistakes, but when mistakes are made, they can be critical. Running a pro style offense takes a lot of patience and self-control, especially in the first half while the offense sets up its constraint plays by trapping the defense on its base plays. This may mean running into eight man fronts the entire first quarter, but the points will come later in the game as the playaction passes open up.

    "Three yards and a cloud of dust. What a boring way to play football!"
    Some people call it boring, but the pro style offense is a methodical approach to playing football. By creating mismatches and setting up plays, the defense is always wrong when a smart quarterback is at the helm of a powerful pro style offense.
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2015
  2. JSU Zack

    JSU Zack How do I IT?

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    Reserved for scheme breakdowns
     
  3. JSU Zack

    JSU Zack How do I IT?

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    Reserved for notable coaches, players, and teams
     
  4. JSU Zack

    JSU Zack How do I IT?

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    My Pro Style Offense
    JSU Zack's Pro Spread 2.0 on SimSports.net

    The second edition of the pro spread is a hybrid offense that mixes elements of the West Coast, Spread, and Air Raid attacks with a focus on the zone running game. Teams with similar attacks are the Alabama Crimson Tide, Houston Texans, and others. You can run this offense as a hurry up or ball control offense. The under center formations predominantly feature two TE or a TE and H back. The shotgun sets are mostly 11 or 10 personnel. For short yardage, the pro spread features variants of the I formation along with a few heavy shotgun formations.
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2014
  5. JSU Zack

    JSU Zack How do I IT?

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    Film & Diagrams
    Levels: Cover 2 Zone Beater

    This is one that I couldn't figure out for a long time. I think I ran across a breakdown from Gruden or Manning or something about a year ago. I don't use it often, but I do enjoy using it as a complement to Under.

    I usually read the outside WR running the short in, and then I read the dig. In a trips formation, the slot running the quick in acts as a clearing route to bait the LB. The dig is there to beat man press. If one of those two routes aren't open, check down.

    I often audible the solo receiver to run a different route based on the coverage. If you set the formation to the boundary, you can really beat DBS in 1-on-1 coverage. This is great for soft Cover 2/4.

    Levels Read Progression from 2x2
    levels.gif
    Levels Read Progression from 3x2 Trey
    levels-trey.gif

    Drive: Cover 2 Man Beater

    Dagger: Cover 3 Beater by @PSUEagle
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2015
  6. JSU Zack

    JSU Zack How do I IT?

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    Over the next few days, I will continue to discuss pro style offenses. Stay tuned, and feel free to ask any questions.
     
  7. SEVERUS

    SEVERUS New Member

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    @JSU Zach can you discuss how to prevent your opponent from pattern reading by using stems/route combo's/concepts that fit together and build off each other? I've heard base plays should fit together and each base play needs a counter and sometimes a counter to the counter.
     
  8. JSU Zack

    JSU Zack How do I IT?

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    @SEVERUS I definitely can. Obviously, some of this stuff isn't in the game, but you would be surprised how much actually is. The route trees in the bunch formations are excellent because they build on top of one another (think Z Spot & Z Spot Dig).
     
  9. SEVERUS

    SEVERUS New Member

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    I was going to put a few basic examples like Drive from the Shallow series and snag from compressed alignments.
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Smash on the left side

    [​IMG]

    Levels on the Left

    [​IMG]
     
    fonzilla likes this.
  10. JSU Zack

    JSU Zack How do I IT?

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    @SEVERUS Good stuff. I like to call that "series" based passing. I'll be sure to include your photos and a full breakdown soon.
     
  11. Sun Devil

    Sun Devil New Member

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    An important concept of some pro styles offense is the quick drop back and pass.


    Notice in shotgun you have about 2 seconds before you can throw in the game. Under center you can exploit a mismatch IMMEDIATELY.

    Read a zone defense and know someone is going to be open for an easy pass right after the snap? Under center pro offenses exploit this.

    This is essentially west coast, and you can drive down the field 2-5 yards at a time. Burn some clock. Throw in a power running game you can essentially kill the clock in the 2nd and 4th quarter.

    The quick drop also works well under center for bunch formations where it is tough to press without 2 safeties over the top. Next time you're up give the quick drop offense a shot, pinch the line though under center style offense can be blown up with a-gap. And you're much more likely to get sacked.
     
  12. SEVERUS

    SEVERUS New Member

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    @ JSU Zach

    Are you still working on it?
     
  13. JSU Zack

    JSU Zack How do I IT?

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    @SEVERUS Yes, I have some stuff offline, but I'm waiting to drop everything once its complete.
     
  14. fonzilla

    fonzilla Well-Known Member

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    So I have been tinkering a little with singleback offense; which playaction passes do you have the most success with? I find it very hit or miss especially playing the people on this site.
     
  15. TXHusker05

    TXHusker05 Well-Known Member NCAA Moderator

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    I like a lot of the PA passes off of Stretch. I know Ace Big, Slot and Y Trips have some, others do as well. It's one of the better PA animations and really does a decent job sucking up user defenders and most have pretty nice routes attached.

    Ace Big has some of the better PA's in the game. The little angle/corner route on PA Weak Flood destroys man (unless it gets mirrored):

    [​IMG]

    My Osborne offense isn't exactly "pro-style" but PA from Ace is fairly important for my limited passing game. Since I mostly base off OZ Stretch, PA off Stretch works the best.

    I would avoid PA off of Bootleg if at all possible. The animation fools no one and by the time you're turned back around to set to throw, a pass rush is going to be in your face. PA off Counter is another one I'd avoid, I like it from the I-Formation but it's a bit awkward out of Ace. If you do run PA off Counter, make sure you flip the play if your QB is right handed, the animation is a lot cleaner because the QB finishes the animation with his feet set ready to throw. That said, I like PA Counter (not Counter Waggle) out of Ace Big. It is the complimentary play to Counter Trap and has a nice Drive concept to one side and a deep comeback to the other.
     
  16. fonzilla

    fonzilla Well-Known Member

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    @TXHusker05 I like the play thats just like that but goes to the otherside. I usually hot route the backside te to a slant or a in route though.
     
  17. fonzilla

    fonzilla Well-Known Member

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  18. TXHusker05

    TXHusker05 Well-Known Member NCAA Moderator

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    I like that one as well. Ace Big is probably my go to pass formation in my Osborne offense. It is loaded with great PA and a pretty good drop back game.

    Some of the automotion PA stuff in Ace is nice but the corresponding run plays aren't always that special. Plus any play with automotion usually leads to users trying to time up the snap with a rush. I'm more run heavy/run extreme than I am pro style but I have a QB coming through the pipeline at Nebraska who may move me closer to Stanford than I am old Nebraska. Might try some new Ace stuff out.
     
  19. JSU Zack

    JSU Zack How do I IT?

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    Over the years, I've studied probably every offense to come around over the last hundred years. When it comes to play action, I like to stick with wing t principles. IMO the waggle play is one of the best constraints in the history of football. The quarterback rolling out away from pursuit with a flood concept and backside post to hold the high safety is unstoppable.
     
  20. JSU Zack

    JSU Zack How do I IT?

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    Took the latest incarnation of my offense on a test drive against @NavyHog. I stayed balanced, but I threw three picks.
     

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